Abenomics is popular here, right?

There was a William Pesek opinion piece in the Japan Times recently that had this line:

Yet optimism about "Abenomics" is mostly an overseas phenomenon. Even though they elected his party, few Japanese seem to view him as the savior they have been waiting decades for.

Why do the Japanese keep give him and his cabinet 70% ratings then? And I thought most overseas people (in money markets at least) disliked Abenomics as they feel it reeks of exchange rate fixing?

This is just a space-filler article until I get round to doing this one

Leave a comment ?

20 Comments.

  1. Pesek n. Person who hangs around Japan long enough to be mistaken for an expert in absolutely anything. See also clueless hack

    Denial arrived in the days immediately after March 11, 2011, when waves as high as 41 meters erased entire towns and overwhelmed a nuclear facility 217 km from Tokyo. As radiation leaked at the Fukushima power plants, authorities assured the nation’s 126 million people that all was well.

    How does anyone get away with a paragraph like this, let alone get paid for it? If he was actually in Japan at the time, then he’s just lying through his teeth.

    Next came anger amid press reports about just how close Japan came to losing Tokyo. We learned more about how then-Prime Minister Naoto Kan stormed into Tepco headquarters, demanded that its staff gain control over the meltdown and literally saved the city from extinction.

    I mean, seriously, how does anyone get paid for this, unless it’s coming out of Naoto Kan’s own pocket? What’s the point of scientists publishing for the media, if the media don’t bother listening?

    Japanese wanted change. They wanted leaders to be more transparent and to disengage the autopilot that had been guiding the country for 20 years.

    Yes, William, that’s right. Japanese were perfectly happy with being governed on autopilot for two decades (hadn’t even noticed it!) until the tsunami. Thank God a big murderous wave made them understand the country like you do. Although I do remember a minor, but rather more nuanced, journalist writing about Koizumi clearly not being on autopilot, but clearly that William Pesek bears no relation to the titan Pesek we have now. The titan now holds forth on a broad range of areas that are in no way beyond his powers of argument.

    News reports of shantytowns, radioactive schools and squandered rebuilding funds became less frequent.

    Regarding coverage of areas and people living with high radiation, this is simply false. The whole squandered funds issue came to light later, and for someone who earns his living by words, he really ought to learn what “shanty town” means, unless he intends to feed the “non-whites fuck up and be poor” prejudice that some of his readers find comfortable.

    Despair arrived by the first anniversary of the quake, when it became clear that little would change. Far from altering Japan’s trajectory, March 11 demonstrated the depth of the nation’s political and social inertia. It also was a reminder that many of the biggest risks Japanese face — earthquakes, Chinese pollution, North Korea’s threats — are beyond their control. Voters were so disillusioned that they even re-elected the Liberal Democratic Party, which they tossed out in disgust in 2009.

    People on this site sometimes belittle us English teachers. They patronise us with the idea that all we do is hold up objects to gawping fish and say “This is a pen.” But when Pesek writes a paragraph that changes focus three times in as many sentences without support for any them, all I can say is that you need us more than you realise.

    Acceptance is now the norm with Prime Minister Shinzo Abe back at the helm after a dismal 2006-2007 stint in the job. Voters seem resigned to let Abe reopen more than 50 nuclear reactors knocked offline two years ago.

    Again, sorry to be all English teacher about this, but accept is a transitive verb. Acceptance of what? That earthquakes and tsunamis happen? That nuclear power stations can go wrong (where is the acceptance of that?) And where in the LDP manifesto or any of Abe’s statements does it say that more than 50 nuclear plants will be open? I understand Pesek obviously isn’t good at Japanese, but this kind of stuff is also available in English.

    Even though they elected his party, few Japanese seem to view [Abe] as the savior they have been waiting decades for.

    Here Pesek is doing the usual gaijin thing of suggesting that Japan is a country caught up in a conservative, dictatorial past, and that the best cure for that is a miraculous leader to order everyone about. Is it just me or does that just make no sense at all?

    Pesek first came on my radar a couple of months ago when he took issue with Economics Nobel laureate Paul Krugman. Krugman argued that if Abe actually followed through with an expansionary policy, rather than the damaging half-hearted, stop-when-you’ve-just-got-going efforts at expansion that had happened over the past 20 years, it would work.

    Pesek’s response? The past twenty years hadn’t worked. :headdesk:

    Being a Nobel laureate doesn’t make you right, but it does make you worth listening to. When a journalist responds like Pesek does, you learn very little about the Nobel laureate, but an awful lot about the quality of the journalist.

    ReplyReply
  2. Haha. English Teachers. LOL :lol:

    ‘This is a pen’. LOL

    must be a sucky job

    ReplyReply
  3. Can anything that appears in the Japan Times outside of wire service reports be really considered “journalism”?- it’s basically a rag that makes your average fishrap “back home” seem like the New York Times.

    ReplyReply
  4. The Chrysanthemum Sniffer

    Same old collective psyche bullshit. None of my friends in Kyoto think that they are part of some sort of grieving mass.

    ReplyReply
  5. VK wrote.
    Again, sorry to be all English teacher about this, but accept is a transitive verb. Acceptance of what?

    You are a bad one.

    ‘Acceptance’ is a noun. The derivation of ‘Accept’ is
    noun = ‘Acceptance’
    verb = ‘To accept’
    adjective = ‘Acceptable’

    ReplyReply
  6. People in Kyoto are never really friends. They just tend to seek out membership in burgeoning cliques. Beware the trope of an alternative veneer when all that lies underneath is nepotism. Ask Arudou? Is he even aware? Locality eludes him.

    ReplyReply
  7. @Varus:

    And if you turn over to page 2 of How to be a Grammar Pedant, you’ll find that the suffix used to derive the noun, -ance, in the case of many verbs of Latinate/French origin, frequently implies the act of doing: X-ance means the act of X-ing. performance, defiance etc. As such, with transitivity being a semantic as well as a syntactic property, the word “acceptance” clearly implies acceptance of something.

    In any case, good luck with your studies. :razz:

    ReplyReply
  8. Wouldn’t the object of acceptance here be implied? I interpret the sentence to mean “acceptance (of government actions) is now the norm”. Admittedly the writer hasn’t made the context very clear, but I don’t see a problem with the usage.

    To take another example, I could say “unrest with government actions has been steady growing, and defiance is now the norm”. Not very elegant, but it gets the point across. I’m more of an “intelligibility” guy myself…

    ReplyReply
  9. @Varus:
    And if you turn over to page 2 of How to be a Grammar Pedant, you’ll find that the suffix used to derive the noun, -ance, in the case of many verbs of Latinate/French origin, frequently implies the act of doing: X-ance means the act of X-ing. performance, defiance etc. As such, with transitivity being a semantic as well as a syntactic property, the word “acceptance” clearly implies acceptance of something.

    You just keep digging yourself in deeper.

    ‘he had an acceptance from the magazine’.

    ‘you must wait for acceptance into the club.’

    http://oxforddictionaries.com/us/definition/american_english/acceptance

    Transitivity is a syntactic quality of English verbs and has nothing to do with English nouns.

    Your semantic argument, likewise, is bullshit.
    Many Latinate/French lexis items, with the suffix ‘ance’ have no semantic quality of doing acting out the base lexical item.
    Brilliance. Flamboyance. Grievance. Vengeance… The list could go on.

    The suffix ance not only has the semantic quality of process and action, but also a state and condition, The semantic qualities of ‘acceptance’ are both a process/action and a state/condition and therefore the writer used ‘acceptance’ correctly, if not so commonly used.

    I luv pulling down eikaiwa monkeys who set themselves up as some sort of grammar god. Consider yourself taught and correct your ignorance.

    ReplyReply
  10. Elegance…….. Fragrance…… Importance. Romance…….

    ReplyReply
  11. @Rob:

    That’s the point – I don’t think the object is clear at all. If it’s acceptance of government actions, then the DPJ would have won the election.

    Pesek is trying to be clever with this whole five stages of grief thing, but it doesn’t work. If anything, it’s western journalists projecting their own stages of grief for the fact that the tsunami and Fukushima crisis didn’t result in Japan becoming one massive trendy suburb of New York designed by Apple and powered by How Much They Care.

    ReplyReply
  12. LOL. The teacher got schooled!

    eikaiwa monkeys LOL :grin:

    VK give it up
    ur not cool m8

    ReplyReply
  13. @Varus:

    A friendly word of advice: if you try to troll someone and they troll you right back, don’t react by losing your temper, as even online, it shows.

    You’ve misunderstood “many” to mean “all” and “frequently” to mean “always”, and so nothing you splenetically wrote – at least the bits that made coherent sense – actually contradicted what I was saying.

    And you’ve also told us all you think “eleg”, “rom” and “brill” are English verbs. Good luck with…er… correcting people.

    @Ken is this Jim Di Griz? It would be like him to use the word “luv” to make himself sound street.

    @iLikeDolphins:

    I may not be as cool as you, but I do have standards.

    ReplyReply
  14. The Chrysanthemum Sniffer

    iLD: that’s kind of the point. Pesek and not a few of his friends think this disaster is something that deeply affects all Japanese. Like Katrina affected all Americans, right? BTW, my friends in “Kyoto” mostly live in the countryside. Although they don’t have the privilege of working in factories, they hardly embody the usual Kyoto stereotype.

    ReplyReply
  15. VK wrote
    at least the bits that made coherent sense – actually contradicted what I was saying.

    I’m not whoever you said whatever I am meant to be. I rarely venture onot this site.

    I just pointed out what an idiot you are, with your faulty knowledge of English syntax / semantics.

    Your attempts at being an English Grammar Nazi, to ridicule Pesek’s post, on the basis of grammatical usage were completely wrong.

    His use of ‘acceptance, a state/condition of being, was perfectly valid.

    Regards

    ReplyReply
  16. @Varus:

    Oh, I see where you’ve got confused. You thought I was saying the sentence was grammatically incorrect. However, I didn’t say that. (You do seem to read carelessly) The problem is that because the implied object of acceptance hasn’t actually been established anywhere, the meaning is unclear. It’s bad writing, not bad grammar.

    Fair enough that you don’t mind impressionistic bullshit journalism. That’s your right. Now do run along and pull off some more monkeys, or whatever it is you do for self-esteem.

    ReplyReply
  17. VK wrote earlier
    Again, sorry to be all English teacher about this, but accept is a transitive verb. Acceptance of what?

    VK write’s
    Oh, I see where you’ve got confused. You thought I was saying the sentence was grammatically incorrect.
    However, I didn’t say that.

    …………………………. :roll: :roll: :roll: :roll:

    ReplyReply
  18. The Chrysanthemum Sniffer

    VK, you’ve just got to have more acceptance. You have to accept. Not Varus’ argument, not “it,” not even something, or anything. You’ve just got to be in a state of acceptance. Why can’t we all just accept?

    ReplyReply
  19. @The Chrysanthemum Sniffer:

    Shit man, that’s deep. Is that boodhist?

    ReplyReply
  20. Well we could always make an acception in your case…

    ReplyReply

Leave a Comment


NOTE - You can use these HTML tags and attributes:
<a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <s> <strike> <strong>