Critical Race Theory paper criticism

Eido tweeted about this paper, Racist Racism: Complicating Whiteness Through the Privilege & Discrimination of Westerners in Japan. I’ve had a read, although I had to give up about halfway through, and some of the social science content is way over my head.

The first thing that struck me was that she footnotes a certain Hawaiiian almost as much as he does himself. The next thing I noticed in the footnotes was that there are a lot of blogs quoted, many of dubious quality, like the charming Tokyo Scum Report.

Now, getting to the meat of the document, we get stuff like this (Page 5):

Even those who naturalize and forsake their original nationalities and names fare no better: Public establishments refuse access to those who look foreign, including naturalized citizens, local governments have been known to oppose giving them suffrage.

That text reads very much as if the them (my italics) refers to naturalised citizens, but the footnotes points towards Debito.org, where the title is “Resolution against NJ Suffrage”. The paragraph carries on:

For example, the highest court has ruled that public employers are permitted to refuse awarding senior posts to minorities (even those native-born), because they do not have the right to hold positions of authority over “real” natives.

Utterly wrong. The paragraph has established she is talking about naturalised citizens, but that court case was regarding Zainichi.

Later on Page 24, she talks about the Tottori ordinance on foreigner human rights, and says:

Notably, the measure has been removed from Tottori Prefecture’s legislative record.

Utterly wrong again. She takes Mr Arudou at face value when he failed to search Google.

I nearly threw my PC out the window when I got to Page 16, where there is a three-page “quote” that read like the first chapter of In Appropriate. Looking at the footnote for it, I read:

This narrative is based on personal experiences, internet postings, information disseminated by human rights activists in Japan, and the author’s interviews with numerous gaijin conducted in the summer of 2012. Experience-based narrative (personal, others’, and even fictional) often contributes significantly to CRT analysis.

So, any old bollocks cobbled up from random internet quotes and anecdotes is material for proving whatever it is she is trying to prove?

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107 Comments.

  1. @JTW:

    Replying to the rest of your comment:

    1. Regarding Japanese fleeing Japan after committing a crime OR Japanese committing a crime overseas then fleeing Japan:

    I’ve heard this argument before regarding the risk of foreigner flight is no greater than a Japanese fleeing the country. Some big differences:

    a. A Japanese person needs to earn a visa to stay overseas. And if the crime is serious enough and an interpol alert is issues, no legit country is going to give them a visa (or even let them in)

    b. Japan can extradite its citizens, or cancel the Japanese person’s passport to keep them from running.

    Edward Snowden is a good recent example of how its not as easy to run away to a foreigner country if your own country wants you badly enough; he has no U.S. passport, which means the only places he can go or transit through are places that have no extradition treaty with the U.S. AND places that will give him asylum (a catch-22, as the qualifications for getting asylum is usually you need to make it to the border as a prerequisite)

    fun fact: like some other countries, Japan does not allow its own citizens to be extradited from Japan for crimes, even though they will extradite non-Japanese to countries* they have treaties with.

    * not for any old reason though: the crime has to be something that’s also illegal in Japan, the punishment can’t be torture or cruel and unusual punishment**, and the crime can’t be considered political.

    ** because Japan executes criminals, it will extradite criminals that would possibly face the death penalty inside Japan for the same crime, but not for a crime that would not face the death penalty in Japan.

    This means that if a Japanese person commits murder in the U.S., but they some how make it to Japan, Japan will not send that person back to the U.S. to be tried and serve time there. Instead, they will try the Japanese person for the crime inside Japan as if the crime happened in Japan, and they will serve time in Japan for the crime if found guilty.

    2. Regarding deporting Japanese citizens that commit crimes from Japan:

    No matter what the average Joe on the street thinks, no decent country deports its own citizens for two reasons:

    it’s a citizen/nationals’s right (“right of abode”) and a human right by international law.

    The world generally frowns on countries that attempt to deport their unwanted citizens: Cuba has deported its criminals once (“Mariel Boatlift”), and England deported its criminals (to Australia). :cool:

    The only legal foreigners in Japan that enjoy special protection from deportation in Japan are Special Permanent Residents. (They can in theory be deported, but only for high crimes against the state like treason or terrorism). Regular Permanent Residents can be deported for the same reasons that regular visa holders can be deported for.

    As I like to say: Japan can fine me, they can imprison me, they can even execute me… but they can no longer deport me. :lol:

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  2. meanwhile in Yokohama Mr Tadpoles is apparently getting reamed out by his own fans vis a vis his Japanese ability…..

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  3. Well mental.

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  4. KT88 (an excellent, elite and exciting new talent)

    L/yoko reminds me of one of those contestants on America Idol (insert other series here) who truly believes him/herself to be supremely talented because his/her mother, friends etc say so.

    L/yoko it seems, has yet to hear himself sing (in this case, speak Japanese) and runs from the room, crying, hands over his ears, choking back the sobs when anyone says… “But L/yoko, sweety, you really need a bit more practice…”

    I almost wrote “Eugh, creative types are all a bit mental, innit?” …but then I remembered who I was writing about. I dare not sully the word. Creative, that is.

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  5. Not a lot of ‘creative thinking’ involved in claiming Japanese don’t sit next to foreigners on trains. More like mundane daily paranoia for low self-esteemed losers.

    “I created the word sheeple! And the Internet! I discovered the Japanese are evil because they don’t understand my perfectly comprehensible Japanese language ability! These people can’t drive! Why are they doing everything so wrong?”

    Japan bashers are like pre-programmed robots.

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  6. Wait!! Stop the er.. Presses? I just found a real excellent, elite and exiting new talent in China. A much more creative talent than KT88 and iLD. Hold on to your hats it’s Joaquin Campos.

    From amazon:
    “Rodrigo Mochales lives in China. He is addicted to sex and alcohol, although not necessarily in that order”

    Huh? You’re hooked right? Sex AND alcohol. It reminds me of someone but I just can’t put my finger on it.

    https://www.amazon.com/dp/B00IWYNR56

    Maybe I’m being to hard on him, at least he’s not passing himself of as an activist.

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  7. Seeking purist intimacy through fucking homeless women on the street? What the fuck was that all about?

    I couldn’t read the sample.

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