Monthly Archives: July 2014

Official web site states basically no welfare for gaijin

It says:

Can workers from abroad get benefits […]?

Usually people who come […] to work can’t get public funds. ‘Public funds’ means most welfare benefits and local authority housing. You might be able to get free hospital treatment and your children will be allowed to go to state school.

 

 

Before someone sends the link to Debito.org with a suitably angry rant, I should point out that this is what the UK says. Furthermore, even EU citizens coming to the UK will soon find their dole money cut faster than the natives.

Other news like over half of British female MPs feeling discriminated against in Parliament brings other ranting from the usual peanut gallery about Japan into focus.

This, of course, does not excuse Japan, but before people make offensive, discriminatory or racist comments about Japan, perhaps they ought to educate themselves on how their own country treats people in similar situations.

 

What on earth is he on about?

This month’s Just Be Cause is all rather complex and confusing, starting with the cartoon that seems to picture Uncle Sam giving Hans a hand job under the tablecloth. One thing I noted in particular was that this month he is not using “we Japanese” – I suspect it his rhetorical device when giving advice to Japanese; this time it features none.

For example, Japan’s pundits have already begun arguing that Japan’s disappointing performance in the World Cup in Brazil was partly down to the fallacy that Japanese bodies are smaller and weaker than those of foreigners.

Which pundits? Did the National Association of Pundits have a get-together and vote on this as this year’s excuse? Or was he just not following the football but wildly guessing that that would be a talking point? Although I didn’t follow the punditry in any depth, the only time I remember height being mentioned was regarding the 190+ cm Greek attacker. Most of the reasons I heard have been regarding a lack of finishers and a lack of pride in the uniform.

The West has largely moved on from this dangerous bunkum, thanks to the “master race” excesses of World War II and Nazi Germany’s Final Solution.

That sounds distinctly strange (and probably all wrong timeline-wise) to me!

[Regarding inferiority complexes] So instead you get isolation, loneliness, anxiety and scant sense of belonging. (I’m sure you long-termers who feel unrecognized for all your efforts to “fit in to Japan” can relate to this.)

Did he just say that Jim Di Griz and other (assuming there are any other) Japan-resident posters on Debito.org have inferiority complexes, and by implication most of the Japologists are probably free from any sense of inferiority? For once I can agree with him!

This “tradition” of ranking oneself in comparison with others, particularly in terms of degrees of civilization, has become ingrained as cultural habit and reflex.

Is this supposed to be a unique-to-Japan trait? Doesn’t much of the West see democracies as superior to the governments in many other parts of the world?

Rather, the default reflex is to see them in terms of comparative national development and civilization.

Really?

For if acceptance, recognition and superlative praise of Japan as a safe, peaceful, developed country are not forthcoming from the outsider, insult and anger almost inevitably ensue. 

I think Mr Arudou has been taken in by Jim Di Griz’ trolling.

Japan Times used to be Gaijin Dame

Oh, how the times have (and the Times has) changed!

The [Japan Times] newspaper deemed the word — the shortened version of gaikokujin (“foreign-country person”) — as “too derogatory,” he says,