It must be nice to get the Japan Times to post your own advertorial

Just Be Cause this month is a rather inappropriate rehash of the intro to In Appropriate:

The only escape is to head back to the airport and exit Japanese society. As many Japanese do.

Indeed. :facepalm:

Leave a comment ?

48 Comments.

  1. Graylandertagger

    Debito’s new article reminds me of Lu Kim from South Park and his hatred of Japanese.

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  2. oh dear, I haven’t had a good laugh like that for a while. what a dork.

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  3. The Chrysanthemum Sniffer

    Is it just me, or does debito actually sound a little bit ill?

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  4. @The Chrysanthemum Sniffer:

    I was thinking the same thing. YOU’RE LOOKING IN MY SHOPPING BASKET STOP LOOKING IN MY SHOPPING BASKET THEY’VE PUT A CHIP UNDER MY SKIN MY EYES MY EYES…

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  5. KT88 (The wannabe herbal natropath)

    Sounds like that Maui Wowee is getting the better of him. Might be time to put the card away and take a T-break?

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  6. This is a very brave article for the JT to publish, all things considered. Clearly the absence of any independently verifiable evidence of the existence of “The Eye” can only mean that it has been classified as a State Secret. The author could get ten years for writing this.

    Of course, the downside of State Secreting “The Eye” means that no one knows it is watching them, leaving them free to run red lights and stop signs, cross the road at random, ride bicycles on the sidewalks while carrying umbrellas and looking at smartphones, force their way up the down stairs at the Hachiko exit of the Ginza line (bastards)…

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  7. What the hell is this article about? He making no sense absolutely.

    Also add Chinese water torture to the list of things he doesn’t understand, but thinks he does.

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  8. Paranoid personality disorder (PPD) is a mental disorder characterized by paranoia and a pervasive, long-standing suspiciousness and generalized mistrust of others. Individuals with this personality disorder may be hypersensitive, easily feel slighted, and habitually relate to the world by vigilant scanning of the environment for clues or suggestions that may validate their fears or biases. Paranoid individuals are eager observers. They think they are in danger and look for signs and threats of that danger, potentially not appreciating other evidence.

    People with this particular disorder may or may not have a tendency to bear grudges, suspiciousness, tendency to interpret others’ actions as hostile, persistent tendency to self-reference, or a tenacious sense of personal right.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Paranoid_personality_disorder

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  9. KT88 (The suspicious lurker)

    @iago: Well as if all the evidence hasn’t been pointing there all along… anyone remember micro-aggression?

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  10. Clearly he’s run out of material and is recycling old ‘jokes’. This column provides the only source of income he has to support his butthole surfer lifestyle in Hawaii.

    Shocking news! Most Japanese people aren’t leaving Japan. I heard some of them even like it here even if they don’t get to destroy roadworks barriers on a whim like the Americans do.

    Ahhh, too much dork porn all at once.

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  11. I wonder if the editorial team at The Japan Times feels any sort of duty of care towards Debito. Do the extra 10-20 page impressions they get for posting his meltdowns really justify their exploitation of someone who is obviously very sick? If they had any moral fiber they would get him to a doctor and put his articles on hiatus until he has recovered.

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  12. I don’t think he’s having meltdowns unless meltdowns come in mild and mundane flavors. He’s got nothing to say and is falling back on stereotypes of his own stereotypes. Doesn’t he get bored of this? It must be dull and dry as fuck to crank this shit out so whatever it is he must be doing it for the money. You know the passion has gone. And it should have gone! He ‘lives’ in Hawaii. Knee deep in teen vagina and Taco Bell. I think he’s phoning it in. Now how much does he get paid? Remember, he lives in a dorm at 50 years old. With a library card.

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  13. “Japanese free of The Eye often go overboard in their conduct, doing loud, brazen things in public they’d never dream of doing in Japan, given the sudden easing of societal boundaries.

    Tabi no haji wa kakisute (“throw away your shame while on a trip”) is the Japanese proverb that justifies such behavior: You don’t know anyone around you and you won’t be there for all that long, so you can do even shameful things if you like.”

    That goes totally against my own experience, and I’ve travelled quite a lot. There is a reason why Japanese tourists are most popular:
    http://mediaroom.expedia.com/travel-news/japanese-travelers-top-list-expedias-first-annual-global-best-tourist-survey-1450

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  14. @Bjoern
    Indeed. Letting the hair down may have been true 35 years ago in some SE Asian locale or S.Korean whorehouse.

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  15. Kudos to this site for scrutinizing the wayward ways of the down-falling Japan Times. It’s not only Debito’s rehashed musings. Zombie management are sucking the life blood out of anyone with a living mind. It’s all about fiefdoms there. Debito, Adelstein, Colin Jones and their ilk all have their little Nietzche niches carved out and have carte blanche to discredit the country that gave them their easy jobs with pompous titles. I hope this site will continue to call the bluff of the JT fluffers.

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  16. The Japan Times cannot even get the most basic things right. They publish a half-assed opinion by Fake Adelstein in the news section and don’t even bother to actually quote from the law itself. One gets the feeling that Jake the Fake never even read the law, and why would he? He’ll take whatever stand will get him publicity action from Bloomberg or any other organization gullible enough to be his con artistry which he calls investigative journalism. After all of this ballyhoo and boulderdash about the Secrecy Bill, we still don’t know even the most basic facts and details about it.

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  17. @JT man:

    Get back to trying to sell your photos, “JT man”

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  18. Heh, it appears somebody is spending their morning up-voting supportive disqus comments…

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  19. I’m sure residents of Daytona Beach, Cairns or Ibiza can tell us all about how ‘go nuts once you’re away from home’ is a uniquely Japanese phenomenon, not found in any other group. :roll:

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  20. In one fell swoop, uncle Debito joins the apologist ranks:

    “If life here is as weirdly oppressive as you insist it is, why on Earth don’t you just go home?”

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  21. KT88 (The realz impressed)

    @iLikedolphins: I don’t think he’s having meltdowns unless meltdowns come in mild and mundane flavors. He’s got nothing to say and is falling back on stereotypes of his own stereotypes.

    This is your best material yet. From strength to strength.

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  22. @sublight:

    Debito is Japanese. What’s your point? :grin:

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  23. Ken on the phone

    @VK: indeed, this time last year he was lecturing on how that line of argument debased reasoned argument. :facepalm:

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  24. @iago:

    Must be important to them, as the seemed to spend quite a while doing it. I’m Impressed.

    The comments on JBC and debito have been decreasing over the last few months. Even FB has given up. Probably the hit rate from disgruntled Englishers and Japologists will keep the advertisers happy and hopefully maintain this monthly joy. He’s probably running short on topics now, without him or most of his commenters living in Japan to get discriminated against. And his forays into current affairs analysis and social science weren’t well received by either crowd.

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  25. @VK:
    So you mean this is him going nuts because he’s away from home?

    The bigger point, of course, is not “other countries do it too, so it’s ok”, but rather that what he describes is pretty universal behavior found in every country, and he completely fails to show why or how Japan stands out in this regard, other than the fact that it’s the only country he can claim familiarity with.

    Just because Japanese has an expression for it doesn’t make it uniquely (or even particularly) a Japanese activity.

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  26. KT88 (I am duh r-eal! Apologies to the Real Iron Sheik)

    Debbi Webbi got away with a lot for a long time. A self-styled, pseudo-expert or sorts.

    The internet, it seems, turned out to be a double-edged sword: it sure did get the message out… and err, it sure did get the message out.
    Oh, how the tides turn.

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  27. If you think the Japan Times is trying to accurately report about Japan, you are missing the point. The Japan Times is basically a whore for everyone in it. The owners use it as a toy for their kids, and it’s a nice way to attack anyone who might hurt interests of NIFCO and their related companies. The editors use it to create their little self-serving fiefdoms, and it’s a great way to take a Harvard scholarship away from disadvantaged Americans who deserve it. Look at every section, every story, and you’ll find nepotism, chronyism, and egotism. It probably has more columnists by weight than any other paper in history. The only people who actually do any work there — the young Japanese reporters — are virtually nameless, without the fanfare of the Fakety Jake crowd. You can comment all you want here, but you won’t change anything as long as the same prima donnas inhabit the same little castles they’ve constructed around them.

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  28. @sublight:

    I was just having a joke about the ambiguity of what it would mean for him to be away from “home” both technically and emotionally.

    Of course it’s a universal habit. To suggest that Japanese are particular known for going crazy is abroad is just silly. People are too busy sitting on the tour bus doing the entire European Union in five days to go crazy.

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  29. Take a look at what the Japan Times covers. Do they ever do any story about what’s happening in Kyushu or Shikoku? Almost never, because it doesn’t serve the self-interests of JT men like me. How about Hokkaido? The only press it gets is when somebody gets overheated about a hot spring. How about Tohoku? The only thing that ever happens there is nuclear meltdowns. They have no other culture whatsoever, according to the JT. I cannot think of any story ever about Sendai.

    Meanwhile, the entertainment section is full of stories about the bands of friends of the writers. The news section is either Jake the Fake opinion pieces or Kyodo-driven drivel. Half of the paper is bad stuff about Okinawa, where almost nobody buys the JT anyway. As for Kansai? There’s one guy who “covers” the area by writing about Fukui nukes and Hashi-moron a few times every year.

    If you live in Japan, you have no idea what’s happening in Japan other than within the social circles of the JT hackdom.

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  30. Does anyone actually subscribe to the JT? I stick to my 10 freebies a month (not JBC). I can’t be bothered buying in newsprint as it’s a day late here in the provinces. Their already niche readership has been curtailed even further this year; no wonder the comments have dried up.

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  31. @JT man: Yeah, the Tohoku region is either the subject of a cancer scare, a matsuri, or to take photos of where people drowned. They don’t even distribute the Sunday edition with the book reviews in Sendai anymore.

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  32. Ken on the phone

    Nice to see someone keeping themselves busy accessing through various proxies to vote up their favoured comments. :roll:

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  33. @VK

    “People are too busy sitting on the tour bus doing the entire European Union in five days to go crazy.”

    You don’t even see a lot of Japanese tourists here (I’m based in Berlin) doing that kind of stuff nowadays.

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  34. What absolutely amazes me, absolutely amazes, is the ability of Christopher Johnson to go to the Philippines, witness all of the devastation, death, and misery, and then come back and indulge in immensely petty Internet squabbling.

    What a gigantic anus of a human being.

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  35. @Ketsuro Ou:

    Then again, this is, if you remember, the same person that publicised his own invented rape stories about his alleged partner.

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  36. sockpuppet identification bot

    @KT88 (The realz impressed):

    Anomaly detected.

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  37. You guys have long got it wrong about David Aldwinckle. The problem is not David. The problem is unqualified, incompetent editors who have not cultivated whatever talent he might have. They don’t challenge him or try to make him better. They let him write any old garbage — Chinese water torture — because the editors themselves are too incompetent to know any better.

    Seriously, they sit in their office all day, then take the train back to Zushi or Ota-ku, or Chigasaki or wherever. They’re knowledge of Japan is based on what they experience in the office and at home. Like NHK, the JT managers are losers who couldn’t cut it in better Japanese companies. the whole thing is a ship of fools. Don’t blame David for that. He has innate gifts of observation, but it’s wasted at the Japan Times.

    You are right in critiquing his columns. But you really should be scrutinizing the managers and editors there, not just David.

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  38. KT88 (the accused)

    @sockpuppet identification bot (teh intrepid investigatarr)

    Looks like my MPD might be getting the better of me, err, us… Was it the elliptical subtitles that gave me away? Everyone needs more ellipses.

    Nice nym by the way. Like how I made it better (should that have been “we”?)?

    Alas though, you are barking the wrong shin by rubbing it on the tree. No really.

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  39. @JT man:

    Hmmm. Just by the by, do you feel that because of all this, they are perhaps failing to recognise the value of stories by seasoned trained reporters with experience of war and threatening other people’s children?

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  40. The problem at JT is lack of religion. They don’t believe in God, The Buddha, Allah or anybody. They don’t feel a calling from above to strive for truth and excellence. They don’t value morality or ethics of journalism or anything.
    Their raison d’etre is simply to guard their seats at the gravy train, and keep their low pay coming in. Anybody who dares challenge that gravy train mentality will get bullied and ostracized. It’s exactly like NHK and many a school in Japan (and other countries).

    David Arudou, Jake the Fake, Mark Puckton, Ben Stubborn, Saori Daimond, all the columnists and editors, are all riding the gravy train.

    Come on here dear boy have a cigar you’re gonna go far. You’re gonna fly high, you’re never gonna die, you’re gonna make it if you try, they’re gonna love you.

    And did we tell you the name of the game, boy? We call it riding the gravy train….

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  41. @JT man:

    Would that be the same NHK that grievously fired an experienced war journalist and child threatener twice for harassment of others?

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  42. @fakeJTMan/CJatwarzone
    You forgot the obligatory METALLICA!!!!!!

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  43. @Dfmoss:

    Let’s not rush to judgement. This might not be the compulsive liar who stalks female journalists when he’s not harassing former employers with abusive and threatening messages. You’d have to have utter shit for brains to impersonate an employee of the company where you wanted a job.

    Sheesh. You wouldn’t see Tabuchi (BA Hons, the London School of Economics, aka somewhere people have actually heard of) begging for work on Twitter. Too much class.

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  44. @VK
    DRATS!! Fooled again!! :!:

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  45. For his own good, I shall from now be blocking JT man.

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  46. Ken on the phone

    And comments on the post are now closed…

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  47. @Ken on the phone:
    Comments closed, which I think is unusual on JT, maybe the comments about him being out of touch and outside Japan were a bit close to home for the editors. And no mention of this article on Debito’s website or in his newsletter. Probably everyone wants this mess forgotten.

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  48. @Impressed:

    Here’s something interesting: do you remember Phillip Brasor’s Lola article (the one where he called her a mongrel, which a lot of commenters found offensive?) The comments have gone.

    http://www.japantimes.co.jp/news/2013/07/06/national/sins-of-the-father-are-rolas-burden/

    Is Japan Times protecting its writers from criticism?

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